big boy

Welp, I guess I have to admit something.

In the realm of homeschooling my preschoolers, I am a colossal failure.

I finally owned up to the fact that I am so utterly unequipped to teach my boys the basic fundamentals. Of academia, that is.

I mean, I can’t even teach them how to hold scissors and a pencil correctly. I don’t know all those cool little tips and tricks that a trained professional knows.

(Doesn’t he look like such a big boy!?!)

I realize that keeping him home with me for an entire year was valuable beyond words. And that he learned much, in that respect. But in the realm of holding a pencil correctly and recognizing letters…well…let’s just say that I have less hair. And the hair that remains is wiry and gray.

Here’s a typical conversation after our homeschool day is over:

Mom: “What letter did we talk about all day?” (let’s say the letter D is the correct answer)

Mathew: “C!”

Mom: “No. Today we talked about D, that says duh-duh-dog. What else starts with D?”

Mathew: “Duh-duh-Mafew!”

Mom: (thinking to herself, oh.my.word) “Moving on…what color did we talk about today. Same color as grass.”

Mathew: “Pink!”

Joseph: “Joseph!”

Oh dear.

I also realize that these are squirmy little four-year-old boys, and I’m sure most of you boy-mom’s are thinking that our learning experience is pretty typical. However, Mathew may be going to Kindergarten next year, and I think it’s important that he doesn’t tell the teacher that grass is pink.

Poor Joseph. He wanted to go to school so badly.

Clearly Mathew thinks it’s totally awesome that he gets to do something that his brother doesn’t.

There’s that smile.

Do not fret. I am not beating myself up about being a preschool homeschool failure. In fact, I’m quite relieved that the majority of the pressure is off. It doesn’t mean that homeschooling is totally off the table, but until my fellas learn some basic fundamentals, I’m retiring as a teacher of the wee ones.

And I would be lying if I said that I didn’t enjoy having some one-on-one time with just Joseph yesterday.

I mean, seriously…can you blame me?

Kim - January 5, 2012 - 10:30 am

They are gorgeous.
Your honesty is refreshing.
Thank you!

Briana - January 5, 2012 - 10:41 am

How cute are those brother pictures!?!

AmyE - January 5, 2012 - 1:07 pm

We went through the puh-puh-dog stage, too. So funny! Love their beautiful happy faces!

Shannon - January 5, 2012 - 2:15 pm

Oh, they outgrow “the grass is pink” stage. Wyatt (as you know) turned 17 today and he rarely says the grass is pink anymore. :) How did big boy school go for Mathew? Hope it went well. Love.

emily - January 5, 2012 - 7:07 pm

I want to cry at the look on poor Joseph’s face! He looks like he’s trying so hard to smile! I’m sure he’ll love his special time with Mommy, though!

Lara - January 5, 2012 - 9:23 pm

Oh this makes me feel so much better! That is EXACTLY how homeschooling goes with Amby. I’m using a curriculum and everything AND I’M A CERTIFIED TEACHER but it is so overwhelming!

Anna - January 5, 2012 - 10:59 pm

Just so you know, my preschool homeschooling attempt with my oldest was a failure, as well. I sent her to school for K-5 and 1st grade and then we went back to homeschooling for 2nd grade. I thought we were through but she actually wanted to. And it was waaaaaay better that second time around….just so you know. ;)

Nancy - January 6, 2012 - 7:36 am

Speaking only for myself, I am no more qualified to teach than my highly educated education-major sister is to be an accountant.

Shelley - January 8, 2012 - 3:28 pm

As a preschool director who could NEVER homeschool my kids let me say good job momma! Way to admit your limitations, not feel guilt over knowing what is right for your boys, and step up to do what they need when they need it. Even if you had chosen to keep teaching them at home only, the point is, you did what is right for your family for now. That is all us moms can do!

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